(via Has Gaudí’s Sagrada Familia Grown Out of Touch?)
You might say that Antoni Gaudí was an architect of the cloth. From 1883 until his death in 1926, the Catalonian master oversaw the construction of the Roman Catholic basilica Temple Expiatori de la Sagrada Família in Barcelona, Spain. When people asked him why it was taking so long, he purportedly replied, “My client isn’t in a hurry.”
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(via Has Gaudí’s Sagrada Familia Grown Out of Touch?)

You might say that Antoni Gaudí was an architect of the cloth. From 1883 until his death in 1926, the Catalonian master oversaw the construction of the Roman Catholic basilica Temple Expiatori de la Sagrada Família in Barcelona, Spain. When people asked him why it was taking so long, he purportedly replied, “My client isn’t in a hurry.”

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(via Making Sense of a Biennial of “Makers”)
NYC Makers: The MAD Biennial is the closest thing you’ll find to a crowd-sourced exhibition on view in New York right now — perhaps anywhere. Conceived during his first weeks on the job last fall by the Museum of Arts and Design’s (MAD) new director, Glenn Adamson, the show was organized at lightening speed, by museum standards: eight months.
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(via Making Sense of a Biennial of “Makers”)

NYC Makers: The MAD Biennial is the closest thing you’ll find to a crowd-sourced exhibition on view in New York right now — perhaps anywhere. Conceived during his first weeks on the job last fall by the Museum of Arts and Design’s (MAD) new director, Glenn Adamson, the show was organized at lightening speed, by museum standards: eight months.

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(via What, Exactly, Is Censorship?)
Last week, the controversial production “Exhibit B” was canceled by the City of London’s Barbican Centre, which issued a statement decrying the “profoundly troubling” protests that “silence artists and performers.” A few days later, the production’s creator, Brett Bailey, put on his purple-tinted glasses and beret to appear in the Guardian‘s editorial section, where he bemoaned his fate
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(via What, Exactly, Is Censorship?)

Last week, the controversial production “Exhibit B” was canceled by the City of London’s Barbican Centre, which issued a statement decrying the “profoundly troubling” protests that “silence artists and performers.” A few days later, the production’s creator, Brett Bailey, put on his purple-tinted glasses and beret to appear in the Guardian‘s editorial section, where he bemoaned his fate

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(via Martin Scorsese Celebrates a New York Literary Institution)
The 50 Year Argument, Martin Scorsese’s new documentary about The New York Review of Books (NYRB), uses the same opening-sequence footage as another film about life in the Big Apple: West Side Story. In both movies, these aerial shots of the city create a quiet suspense for the activity teeming below. Scorsese, perhaps the quintessential New York filmmaker, alludes to the feud in West Side Story to ultimately portray a different type of big-city spat: the constructive action of intellectual debate.
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(via Martin Scorsese Celebrates a New York Literary Institution)

The 50 Year Argument, Martin Scorsese’s new documentary about The New York Review of Books (NYRB), uses the same opening-sequence footage as another film about life in the Big Apple: West Side Story. In both movies, these aerial shots of the city create a quiet suspense for the activity teeming below. Scorsese, perhaps the quintessential New York filmmaker, alludes to the feud in West Side Story to ultimately portray a different type of big-city spat: the constructive action of intellectual debate.

READ MORE