(via Satan, You’ve Changed)
At the beginning of this year, the Satanic Temple of New York revealed its designs for a monument of the devil. Proposed to be placed on the grounds of the Oklahoma State Capitol, it is a challenge to the permission of religious viewpoints on the grounds represented by the granite monument of the Ten Commandments there since 2009. The statue — now lodged in a secret Red Hook warehouse while its future remains in limbo — depicts a seated goat-headed Baphomet, with two children at its side, and even a place for visitors to sit on Satan’s lap.
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(via Satan, You’ve Changed)

At the beginning of this year, the Satanic Temple of New York revealed its designs for a monument of the devil. Proposed to be placed on the grounds of the Oklahoma State Capitol, it is a challenge to the permission of religious viewpoints on the grounds represented by the granite monument of the Ten Commandments there since 2009. The statue — now lodged in a secret Red Hook warehouse while its future remains in limbo — depicts a seated goat-headed Baphomet, with two children at its side, and even a place for visitors to sit on Satan’s lap.

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(via A Documentarian of Memory)
Chris Marker’s death two years ago, on the day of his 91st birthday, heralded a surge of renewed interest in the enigmatic French filmmaker. In global unison, restorations, exhibitions, and graffiti tributes have since paid affectionate homage to Marker — some efforts even attempting to exhume aspects of his career that have long been overshadowed by his two best-loved works, La jetée (The pier, 1962) and Sans soleil (Sunless, 1982).
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(via A Documentarian of Memory)

Chris Marker’s death two years ago, on the day of his 91st birthday, heralded a surge of renewed interest in the enigmatic French filmmaker. In global unison, restorations, exhibitions, and graffiti tributes have since paid affectionate homage to Marker — some efforts even attempting to exhume aspects of his career that have long been overshadowed by his two best-loved works, La jetée (The pier, 1962) and Sans soleil (Sunless, 1982).

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(via LACMA Is the First Museum to Join Snapchat)
Social media has become a staple of museum communications plans, so we weren’t surprised to learn that the Los Angeles County Museum of Art (LACMA) became the first museum to join the Venice Beach–based social network last month. But why would this august museum decide to join this particular social network? Maybe because it’s the fourth most popular with US teens (behind Facebook, YouTube, and Instagram)? According to one stat, 43% of 12- to 24-year-olds use Snapchat at least once a day.
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(via LACMA Is the First Museum to Join Snapchat)

Social media has become a staple of museum communications plans, so we weren’t surprised to learn that the Los Angeles County Museum of Art (LACMA) became the first museum to join the Venice Beach–based social network last month. But why would this august museum decide to join this particular social network? Maybe because it’s the fourth most popular with US teens (behind Facebook, YouTube, and Instagram)? According to one stat, 43% of 12- to 24-year-olds use Snapchat at least once a day.

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Indigenous Fine Art Market, John Torres Nez, Native American Art, Santa Fe, Santa Fe Indian Art Market (via Native American Artists Take Control of Their Market)
ALBUQUERQUE — Not often, when a popular board member leaves an arts organization, do constituents get riled enough to do something about it, other than perhaps grumble on Facebook. However, John Torres Nez’s resignation from the Southwestern Association of Indian Art (SWAIA) in April tapped a well of discontent that had been bubbling for a while: Native artists were unhappy with Native art markets run by non-Natives.
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Indigenous Fine Art Market, John Torres Nez, Native American Art, Santa Fe, Santa Fe Indian Art Market (via Native American Artists Take Control of Their Market)

ALBUQUERQUE — Not often, when a popular board member leaves an arts organization, do constituents get riled enough to do something about it, other than perhaps grumble on Facebook. However, John Torres Nez’s resignation from the Southwestern Association of Indian Art (SWAIA) in April tapped a well of discontent that had been bubbling for a while: Native artists were unhappy with Native art markets run by non-Natives.

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(via Police Cut Images from Artwork over Kiddie Porn Concerns)
In an ongoing case, Australian artist Paul Yore is facing child pornography charges following complaints concerning his work in a group show on view last year at Melbourne’s Linden Centre of Contemporary Arts. The art in question is part of Yore’s site-specific, large-scale installation “Everything is Fucked,” a tottering mountain of colorful bric-a-brac that viewers could enter.
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(via Police Cut Images from Artwork over Kiddie Porn Concerns)

In an ongoing case, Australian artist Paul Yore is facing child pornography charges following complaints concerning his work in a group show on view last year at Melbourne’s Linden Centre of Contemporary Arts. The art in question is part of Yore’s site-specific, large-scale installation “Everything is Fucked,” a tottering mountain of colorful bric-a-brac that viewers could enter.

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(via Native American Artists Take Control of Their Market)

ALBUQUERQUE — Not often, when a popular board member leaves an arts organization, do constituents get riled enough to do something about it, other than perhaps grumble on Facebook. However, John Torres Nez’s resignation from the Southwestern Association of Indian Art (SWAIA) in April tapped a well of discontent that had been bubbling for a while: Native artists were unhappy with Native art markets run by non-Natives.

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(via Native American Artists Take Control of Their Market)

ALBUQUERQUE — Not often, when a popular board member leaves an arts organization, do constituents get riled enough to do something about it, other than perhaps grumble on Facebook. However, John Torres Nez’s resignation from the Southwestern Association of Indian Art (SWAIA) in April tapped a well of discontent that had been bubbling for a while: Native artists were unhappy with Native art markets run by non-Natives.

READ MORE