Hyperallergic LABS

Oct 16

(via Matisse’s “Swimming Pool” Goes on View for the First Time in Two Decades)
When Henri Matisse: The Cut-Outs opened this past Sunday at the Museum of Modern Art (MoMA), the artist’s only site-specific cut-out piece went on public view for the first time in over 20 years.
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(via Matisse’s “Swimming Pool” Goes on View for the First Time in Two Decades)

When Henri Matisse: The Cut-Outs opened this past Sunday at the Museum of Modern Art (MoMA), the artist’s only site-specific cut-out piece went on public view for the first time in over 20 years.

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(via Women and Men Looking and Not Looking at Art)
For better or for worse, visual art seems to be having a populist moment. On the “better” side of that opposition is the fact that more people are taking the time to think about and engage with art; on the “worse” side is that for a number of those people, engaging with art means using it as a backdrop.
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(via Women and Men Looking and Not Looking at Art)

For better or for worse, visual art seems to be having a populist moment. On the “better” side of that opposition is the fact that more people are taking the time to think about and engage with art; on the “worse” side is that for a number of those people, engaging with art means using it as a backdrop.

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Oct 15

(via In a Booth at Frieze London, Everything’s Home but Nobody’s There)
LONDON — While one Helly Nahmad sits in a bare concrete prison cell in upstate New York, another Helly Nahmad strides around his lavish Frieze Masters booth in London’s chi-chi Regent’s Park. I don’t know how captivity is suiting the former, but freedom isn’t doing that much for the latter.
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(via In a Booth at Frieze London, Everything’s Home but Nobody’s There)

LONDON — While one Helly Nahmad sits in a bare concrete prison cell in upstate New York, another Helly Nahmad strides around his lavish Frieze Masters booth in London’s chi-chi Regent’s Park. I don’t know how captivity is suiting the former, but freedom isn’t doing that much for the latter.

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(via Two Time Capsules Opened After More Than a Century)
The two oldest known and unopened time capsules were unsealed last week, one in New York and the other in Boston. The former was encased in a bronze, claw-footed chest by Revolutionary War aficionados in 1914 in Manhattan; the latter placed inside a copper box in a gold lion statue in 1901 and from there cast into the realm of urban legend until last month, when the statue was brought down from Boston’s Old State House for restoration.
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(via Two Time Capsules Opened After More Than a Century)

The two oldest known and unopened time capsules were unsealed last week, one in New York and the other in Boston. The former was encased in a bronze, claw-footed chest by Revolutionary War aficionados in 1914 in Manhattan; the latter placed inside a copper box in a gold lion statue in 1901 and from there cast into the realm of urban legend until last month, when the statue was brought down from Boston’s Old State House for restoration.

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(via A Tale of Motherhood in Julie Blackmon’s Playful Photographs)
Fifteen years ago, photographer Julie Blackmon was exploring the basement of her Springfield, Missouri, home when she discovered an old dark room. It dated to around 1907, having been used by the city’s first-ever photography business. Blackmon was then a housewife, busy raising three young children. She hadn’t touched a camera in any serious way since her undergraduate photography courses almost 15 years earlier. But she decided to buy an enlarger, and the dark room quickly became her escape from the demands of domestic life.
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(via A Tale of Motherhood in Julie Blackmon’s Playful Photographs)

Fifteen years ago, photographer Julie Blackmon was exploring the basement of her Springfield, Missouri, home when she discovered an old dark room. It dated to around 1907, having been used by the city’s first-ever photography business. Blackmon was then a housewife, busy raising three young children. She hadn’t touched a camera in any serious way since her undergraduate photography courses almost 15 years earlier. But she decided to buy an enlarger, and the dark room quickly became her escape from the demands of domestic life.

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(via Guarding Jeff Koons)
“Nevertheless, some museum visitors might see guards, so often silent and stone-faced, as more machine than human. That is a misconception. Many guards … speak with obvious passion about the exhibitions, as well as the visitors, for which they feel responsible.”
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(via Guarding Jeff Koons)

“Nevertheless, some museum visitors might see guards, so often silent and stone-faced, as more machine than human. That is a misconception. Many guards … speak with obvious passion about the exhibitions, as well as the visitors, for which they feel responsible.”

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(via Three Poems by Sandra Simonds)
Our poetry editor, Joe Pan, has selected three poems by Sandra Simonds for his series that brings original poetry to the screens of Hyperallergic readers.
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(via Three Poems by Sandra Simonds)

Our poetry editor, Joe Pan, has selected three poems by Sandra Simonds for his series that brings original poetry to the screens of Hyperallergic readers.

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(via At SITE Santa Fe, Landscapes Unsettled and in Motion)
SANTA FE — Unsettled Landscapes, the first installment of SITElines, SITE Santa Fe’s reimagined model for how biennials are conceived, curated, and structured, is a conglomeration of art from the Americas. The exhibition is quite large, featuring 40 artists from 15 different countries and spanning three generations.
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(via At SITE Santa Fe, Landscapes Unsettled and in Motion)

SANTA FE — Unsettled Landscapes, the first installment of SITElines, SITE Santa Fe’s reimagined model for how biennials are conceived, curated, and structured, is a conglomeration of art from the Americas. The exhibition is quite large, featuring 40 artists from 15 different countries and spanning three generations.

READ MORE