Hyperallergic LABS

Sep 15

(via Archeologists Use Digital Underground Mapping to Discover the Landscape of Stonehenge)
A massive experiment in virtual archeology has led to the mapping of 3,000 acres around Stonehenge, and with it the discovery of a host of new information about the area, including over a dozen previously unknown monuments, National Geographic reported. The Stonehenge Hidden Landscape Project, led by researchers at the University of Birmingham and the Ludwig Boltzmann Institute in Austria, has spent four years using an array of technology — aerial photography, laser scanning, airborne imaging spectroscopy, magnetic prospection, ground-penetrating radar, electromagnetic induction, and more — to uncover the landscape around Stonehenge without actually unearthing it.
READ MORE

(via Archeologists Use Digital Underground Mapping to Discover the Landscape of Stonehenge)

A massive experiment in virtual archeology has led to the mapping of 3,000 acres around Stonehenge, and with it the discovery of a host of new information about the area, including over a dozen previously unknown monuments, National Geographic reported. The Stonehenge Hidden Landscape Project, led by researchers at the University of Birmingham and the Ludwig Boltzmann Institute in Austria, has spent four years using an array of technology — aerial photography, laser scanning, airborne imaging spectroscopy, magnetic prospection, ground-penetrating radar, electromagnetic induction, and more — to uncover the landscape around Stonehenge without actually unearthing it.

READ MORE

(via Required Reading)
This week, Scotland’s Old Masters crisis, Anselm Kiefer’s 200-acre studio, Virginia Woolf and portraiture, Apple Watch buzz, ISIS think pieces, 10 important books in people’s lives, and more.
READ MORE

(via Required Reading)

This week, Scotland’s Old Masters crisis, Anselm Kiefer’s 200-acre studio, Virginia Woolf and portraiture, Apple Watch buzz, ISIS think pieces, 10 important books in people’s lives, and more.

READ MORE

(via Beer with a Painter: Eric Aho)
When I first met Eric Aho in New Hampshire two summers ago, we were sitting in the grass in front of the bakery at Orchard Hill Farm. We bonded over the best bread in the world (really!) made by his former student at the Putney School, and the next day I visited his studio, just across the Vermont border. I remember being struck by the beautiful mess on his studio floor: bowls of yellow pigment, layers of encrusted paint, wide, loaded brushes, and work gloves. It was earthy and real, like the bread and the vista of farm fields from the day before.
READ MORE

(via Beer with a Painter: Eric Aho)

When I first met Eric Aho in New Hampshire two summers ago, we were sitting in the grass in front of the bakery at Orchard Hill Farm. We bonded over the best bread in the world (really!) made by his former student at the Putney School, and the next day I visited his studio, just across the Vermont border. I remember being struck by the beautiful mess on his studio floor: bowls of yellow pigment, layers of encrusted paint, wide, loaded brushes, and work gloves. It was earthy and real, like the bread and the vista of farm fields from the day before.

READ MORE

(via James Bishop’s Incommodious Beauty)
I have been waiting to see a large selection of James Bishop’s paintings since the mid-1970s, ever since reading John Ashbery’s appraisal in a secondhand copy of Art News Annual 1966: “It is a shame that Bishop’s paintings, partly owing to his personal aloofness, seem destined for neglect in both New York and Paris, for he is one of the great original American painters of his generation.”
READ MORE

(via James Bishop’s Incommodious Beauty)

I have been waiting to see a large selection of James Bishop’s paintings since the mid-1970s, ever since reading John Ashbery’s appraisal in a secondhand copy of Art News Annual 1966: “It is a shame that Bishop’s paintings, partly owing to his personal aloofness, seem destined for neglect in both New York and Paris, for he is one of the great original American painters of his generation.”

READ MORE

(via How Food Stole the Avant-Garde: Letter From Copenhagen)
Dear Art Friends,
It was my last day in Copenhagen and I had already been to the zoo and was rushing to a tasting of mummified roe deer, fried bee larvae and moth cheese. The taxi from the zoo stopped on the pier between Noma, hailed (by those in the know) as the number one restaurant in the world, and the Nordic Food Lab houseboat. I had been telling the bemused driver all about the past two days in the big red MAD4 tent. “Food is the new black!” he chortled as he waved goodbye and pulled away.
READ MORE

(via How Food Stole the Avant-Garde: Letter From Copenhagen)

Dear Art Friends,

It was my last day in Copenhagen and I had already been to the zoo and was rushing to a tasting of mummified roe deer, fried bee larvae and moth cheese. The taxi from the zoo stopped on the pier between Noma, hailed (by those in the know) as the number one restaurant in the world, and the Nordic Food Lab houseboat. I had been telling the bemused driver all about the past two days in the big red MAD4 tent. “Food is the new black!” he chortled as he waved goodbye and pulled away.

READ MORE

(via In Transit: Willem van Genk’s Cardboard Trolleys)
The first United States exhibition of Dutch artist Willem van Genk’s work at the American Folk Art Museum (September 10–November 30) offers a comic counterpoint to the recent Futurist show at the Guggenheim. The Futurists idealized trains, planes, and automobiles as sleek exemplars of power and speed; they typically represented these vehicles in iconic fashion, removed from the real world of crowded stations, airports, and streets. Van Genk, a self-taught artist diagnosed with schizophrenia who died in 2005 at 78, was similarly fascinated by transportation.
READ MORE

(via In Transit: Willem van Genk’s Cardboard Trolleys)

The first United States exhibition of Dutch artist Willem van Genk’s work at the American Folk Art Museum (September 10–November 30) offers a comic counterpoint to the recent Futurist show at the Guggenheim. The Futurists idealized trains, planes, and automobiles as sleek exemplars of power and speed; they typically represented these vehicles in iconic fashion, removed from the real world of crowded stations, airports, and streets. Van Genk, a self-taught artist diagnosed with schizophrenia who died in 2005 at 78, was similarly fascinated by transportation.

READ MORE

(via Blood and Soil: Vienna Actionism’s Dangerous Game)
Its Wikipedia entry calls it “a short and violent movement,” and even compared with the aesthetic extremes of the 1960s, the unrelenting art of Vienna Actionism stands apart. After the passage of fifty years, the questions it raised about the limits and origins of art remain no less troubling or closer to resolution.
READ MORE

(via Blood and Soil: Vienna Actionism’s Dangerous Game)

Its Wikipedia entry calls it “a short and violent movement,” and even compared with the aesthetic extremes of the 1960s, the unrelenting art of Vienna Actionism stands apart. After the passage of fifty years, the questions it raised about the limits and origins of art remain no less troubling or closer to resolution.

READ MORE

(via Overheard in the Art World)
Hello, my beloved art world. I am back again, by popular demand, to deliver to you those lovely phrases that we all utter amongst our boastful, arrogant, self-involved, art-loving selves.
READ MORE

(via Overheard in the Art World)

Hello, my beloved art world. I am back again, by popular demand, to deliver to you those lovely phrases that we all utter amongst our boastful, arrogant, self-involved, art-loving selves.

READ MORE