Hyperallergic LABS

Jul 28

(via Native Activist Charges Art Students with Plagiarism)
A Native activist and organizer is claiming that a group of students at the California College of the Arts stole her work for a project that received a monetary award from the school’s Center for Art and Public Life.
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(via Native Activist Charges Art Students with Plagiarism)

A Native activist and organizer is claiming that a group of students at the California College of the Arts stole her work for a project that received a monetary award from the school’s Center for Art and Public Life.

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(via Required Reading)
This week, defining “public,” the Mona Lisa of digital art, the most modern curator, Baffler online, white flags over Brooklyn, the Chinese role in WWI, Americans eligible for Man Booker prize for the first time, and more.
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(via Required Reading)

This week, defining “public,” the Mona Lisa of digital art, the most modern curator, Baffler online, white flags over Brooklyn, the Chinese role in WWI, Americans eligible for Man Booker prize for the first time, and more.

READ MORE

(via Fagen’s Critical Catalogue (July 2014, Part 2))
In part 2 of this month, reviews of Lana Del Rey, Sam Smith, Indian Ocean, and Kitten.
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(via Fagen’s Critical Catalogue (July 2014, Part 2))

In part 2 of this month, reviews of Lana Del Rey, Sam Smith, Indian Ocean, and Kitten.

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(via Marilyn Chin: Poet, Translator, Provocateur)
A few weeks ago, on Centre Street–just north of Canal, the longtime boundary between Chinatown and the rest of Manhattan–I was on a panel, Re-imagining Asian American (and American) Poetry, at the Museum of Chinese in America (MoCA). Dorothy Wang, author of the recently published book, Thinking Its Presence: Form, Race, and Subjectivity in Contemporary Asian American Poetry (Stanford University Press, 2013), hosted the panel.
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(via Marilyn Chin: Poet, Translator, Provocateur)

A few weeks ago, on Centre Street–just north of Canal, the longtime boundary between Chinatown and the rest of Manhattan–I was on a panel, Re-imagining Asian American (and American) Poetry, at the Museum of Chinese in America (MoCA). Dorothy Wang, author of the recently published book, Thinking Its Presence: Form, Race, and Subjectivity in Contemporary Asian American Poetry (Stanford University Press, 2013), hosted the panel.

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Cavin-Morris Gallery, Dan Dryden, Don Christensen, Emery Blagdon, Film, Outsider Art (via Now on Film: The Mysterious Healing Power of Emery Blagdon’s Art)
Yesterday evening’s nationwide PBS broadcast of Kelly Rush’s new documentary short, Emery Blagdon & His Healing Machine, served as a reminder of just what it is that distinguishes the lives and careers of the most exemplary outsider artists. (The film can also be viewed on the website of Nebraska’s NET public-television network, which offers an informative Blagdon subsection.)
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Cavin-Morris Gallery, Dan Dryden, Don Christensen, Emery Blagdon, Film, Outsider Art (via Now on Film: The Mysterious Healing Power of Emery Blagdon’s Art)

Yesterday evening’s nationwide PBS broadcast of Kelly Rush’s new documentary short, Emery Blagdon & His Healing Machine, served as a reminder of just what it is that distinguishes the lives and careers of the most exemplary outsider artists. (The film can also be viewed on the website of Nebraska’s NET public-television network, which offers an informative Blagdon subsection.)

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(via Single Point Perspective: Peter Acheson’s Table)
first encountered Peter Acheson’s table sculpture several years ago. A strange thing that continues to change through the years, the weather and the seasons. Never finished, or, as Acheson himself has said, “It resists the fantasy of completion,” it occupies a place few artists are willing to take their work, suspended in longing and transition.
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(via Single Point Perspective: Peter Acheson’s Table)

first encountered Peter Acheson’s table sculpture several years ago. A strange thing that continues to change through the years, the weather and the seasons. Never finished, or, as Acheson himself has said, “It resists the fantasy of completion,” it occupies a place few artists are willing to take their work, suspended in longing and transition.

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nevver:

The New Yorker


Funny

nevver:

The New Yorker

Funny

(Source: newyorker.com, via thisistheverge)

(via Man of Letters: Ray Johnson Art in Motion)
Not Nothing: Selected Writings By Ray Johnson, 1954-1995, recently released by Siglio Press, is edited by poet and translator Elizabeth Zuba, with an essay by poet and novelist Kevin Killian. Coinciding with its appearance is a reprint of The Paper Snake, a slim volume of Johnson’s writings originally published in 1965 by Something Else Press, which was founded by Johnson’s close friend and correspondent, poet Dick Higgins.
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(via Man of Letters: Ray Johnson Art in Motion)

Not Nothing: Selected Writings By Ray Johnson, 1954-1995, recently released by Siglio Press, is edited by poet and translator Elizabeth Zuba, with an essay by poet and novelist Kevin Killian. Coinciding with its appearance is a reprint of The Paper Snake, a slim volume of Johnson’s writings originally published in 1965 by Something Else Press, which was founded by Johnson’s close friend and correspondent, poet Dick Higgins.

READ MORE