(via On the Maidan Uprising and ‘Imaginary Archive’ in Kiev)
With a sharp tug, the soot-covered tire slides free from a pile stacked over my head. Then another. And another. Soon I have fifteen tires loosened. It’s April 22, 2014, and along with local curator Larissa Babij I am standing on the battle-charred northeast corner of Kiev, Ukraine’s Independence Square, known locally as Maidan (“Square”). Only a few months earlier, the state’s special military units and riot police confronted an assortment of extra-paramilitary forces and ordinary citizens here as they attempted, and ultimately succeeded, to oust their corrupt president, Viktor Yanukovych, from office.
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(via On the Maidan Uprising and ‘Imaginary Archive’ in Kiev)

With a sharp tug, the soot-covered tire slides free from a pile stacked over my head. Then another. And another. Soon I have fifteen tires loosened. It’s April 22, 2014, and along with local curator Larissa Babij I am standing on the battle-charred northeast corner of Kiev, Ukraine’s Independence Square, known locally as Maidan (“Square”). Only a few months earlier, the state’s special military units and riot police confronted an assortment of extra-paramilitary forces and ordinary citizens here as they attempted, and ultimately succeeded, to oust their corrupt president, Viktor Yanukovych, from office.

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(via A Visit to Portland’s Graffiti Haven)
PORTLAND, Ore. — When I asked artist Rx Skulls where to shoot graffiti and street art when I came to town this past April, his most emphatic suggestion was Taylor Electric. Because Portland has a zero-tolerance policy on graffiti — no graffiti on any outside walls, with or without the owner’s consent — the city is low on murals and wheatpastes and rich in sticker art. The exception is in the less-policed industrial district, particularly the burned-out shell of Taylor Electric at 3rd and Clay.
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(via A Visit to Portland’s Graffiti Haven)

PORTLAND, Ore. — When I asked artist Rx Skulls where to shoot graffiti and street art when I came to town this past April, his most emphatic suggestion was Taylor Electric. Because Portland has a zero-tolerance policy on graffiti — no graffiti on any outside walls, with or without the owner’s consent — the city is low on murals and wheatpastes and rich in sticker art. The exception is in the less-policed industrial district, particularly the burned-out shell of Taylor Electric at 3rd and Clay.

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(via Getting Up Close and Personal with the Brazilian Protests)
For the past year, a photography collective in São Paulo, Brazil, has been creating short, troubling, and cinematic videos of the public protests that first swept the country in 2013. 12PM Photographic’s films are a far cry from the grainy cellphone videos that flood YouTube. Crisp and composed, they bring the South American conflict into alarmingly clear focus.
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(via Getting Up Close and Personal with the Brazilian Protests)

For the past year, a photography collective in São Paulo, Brazil, has been creating short, troubling, and cinematic videos of the public protests that first swept the country in 2013. 12PM Photographic’s films are a far cry from the grainy cellphone videos that flood YouTube. Crisp and composed, they bring the South American conflict into alarmingly clear focus.

READ MORE

(via The Library That Kept Darwin Company for Five Years, Reconstructed)
For the five years Charles Darwin spent sailing on the HMS Beagle — a journey intended to last just two years — the budding naturalist had around 404 books for company (along with the crew of over 70). The collection mostly belong to Captain FitzRoy, who had taken over after the previous captain, Pringle Stokes, committed suicide. After the ship returned to England on October 2, 1836, the books were dispersed, only now reassembled in a digital form.
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(via The Library That Kept Darwin Company for Five Years, Reconstructed)

For the five years Charles Darwin spent sailing on the HMS Beagle — a journey intended to last just two years — the budding naturalist had around 404 books for company (along with the crew of over 70). The collection mostly belong to Captain FitzRoy, who had taken over after the previous captain, Pringle Stokes, committed suicide. After the ship returned to England on October 2, 1836, the books were dispersed, only now reassembled in a digital form.

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(via What Did Disability Look Like in the 19th Century?)
Clubs for ugly people, ear trumpets designed for mourners, mesmerism as a cure — disability in the 19th century reflected all of the Victorian era’s oddities and societal changes. Nineteenth-Century Disability: Cultures & Contexts is a digital research archive of text and images on this more overlooked aspect of history.
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(via What Did Disability Look Like in the 19th Century?)

Clubs for ugly people, ear trumpets designed for mourners, mesmerism as a cure — disability in the 19th century reflected all of the Victorian era’s oddities and societal changes. Nineteenth-Century Disability: Cultures & Contexts is a digital research archive of text and images on this more overlooked aspect of history.

READ MORE