(via Dancing Through the Question of Freedom)
Whisper, listen, whisper, listen. Whispers say we’re free. Rumors flyin’, must be lyin’. Can it really be? Can’t conceive it, can’t believe it. But that’s what they say. Slave no longer, slave no longer, this is Freedom Day.
These lyrics come from “Freedom Day,” a track from Max Roach’s 1960 album We Insist! Max Roach’s Freedom Now Suite and a major influence on choreographer Kyle Abraham/Abraham.In.Motion, who premiered his new work “The Watershed” at New York Live Arts last week, part of the culmination of his tenure as that theater’s Resident Commissioned Artist. In a director’s note, Abraham references Max Roach’s response when asked about “Freedom Day”: “Freedom itself was so hard to grasp … we don’t really understand what it is to be free.”
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(via Dancing Through the Question of Freedom)

Whisper, listen, whisper, listen. Whispers say we’re free.
Rumors flyin’, must be lyin’. Can it really be?
Can’t conceive it, can’t believe it. But that’s what they say.
Slave no longer, slave no longer, this is Freedom Day.

These lyrics come from “Freedom Day,” a track from Max Roach’s 1960 album We Insist! Max Roach’s Freedom Now Suite and a major influence on choreographer Kyle Abraham/Abraham.In.Motion, who premiered his new work “The Watershed” at New York Live Arts last week, part of the culmination of his tenure as that theater’s Resident Commissioned Artist. In a director’s note, Abraham references Max Roach’s response when asked about “Freedom Day”: “Freedom itself was so hard to grasp … we don’t really understand what it is to be free.”

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(via Berlin’s Fashion Futurisms)
BERLIN — The embers of Berlin Alternative Fashion Week (BAFW) will continue to burn beyond its conclusion this past weekend. Ignited by a riotous spirit and explosive energy, this week-long series of events represented a restless, demanding, and at times extravagant provocation. Under the directorship of founder Adam Rose, BAFW pulled together the intersecting spheres of visual art, sound, and fashion to consider the role of the runway as a contemplative and exploratory space for experimenting with visions of our future selves.
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(via Berlin’s Fashion Futurisms)

BERLIN — The embers of Berlin Alternative Fashion Week (BAFW) will continue to burn beyond its conclusion this past weekend. Ignited by a riotous spirit and explosive energy, this week-long series of events represented a restless, demanding, and at times extravagant provocation. Under the directorship of founder Adam Rose, BAFW pulled together the intersecting spheres of visual art, sound, and fashion to consider the role of the runway as a contemplative and exploratory space for experimenting with visions of our future selves.

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An Anti-Zen Garden Full of Skulls and More Unearthly Unease

An Anti-Zen Garden Full of Skulls and More Unearthly Unease

Hisashi Tenmyouya, (b. 1966), Rhyme, 2012. Acrylic paint, gold leaf on wood; inkjet print on paper, mounted on wood; each 49 7/8 x 118 1/8 in. Chazen Museum of Art, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Colonel Rex W. & Maxine Schuster Radsch Endowment Fund purchase, 2013.23.1-.2a-b. Fiberglass reinforced polyester, calcium carbonate; variable dimensions. Chazen Museum of Art, University of Wisconsin-Madison, John H. Van Vleck Endowment Fund purchase, 2013.23.3a-g.

Hisashi Tenmyouya raking “Rhyme” (2012) (photograph by the author for Hyperallergic)

The beauty and hell of utopia and dystopia is the subject of Japan Society’s Garden of Unearthly Delights, which opened today in Manhattan. With three contemporary Japanese artists — Manabu Ikeda, Hisashi Tenmyouya, and collective teamLab — the exhibition resonates with the allure of nature, our destruction of…

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(via Upstate and Down with Pioneering Media Art)
Last month, the New Museum held a public dialogue, hosted by Rhizome.org, in response to the recent publishing of The Emergence of Video Processing Tools: Television Becoming Unplugged, a collection of essays edited by Kathy High, Sherry Miller Hocking, and Mona Jimenez, that, among other things, makes clear the central role of upstate New York in global media history. That vast, often vague, less metropolitan expanse that New Yorkers usually call “Upstate” has been a major force in the evolution of contemporary media art. Upstate New York artists and engineers designed some of the first technologies that took media-making out of industrial control and into experimenters’ hands, and institutions like the Experimental Television Center helped to transform people’s relationships to media, providing funding and support in New York State, New York City, across the nation and beyond.
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(via Upstate and Down with Pioneering Media Art)

Last month, the New Museum held a public dialogue, hosted by Rhizome.org, in response to the recent publishing of The Emergence of Video Processing Tools: Television Becoming Unplugged, a collection of essays edited by Kathy High, Sherry Miller Hocking, and Mona Jimenez, that, among other things, makes clear the central role of upstate New York in global media history. That vast, often vague, less metropolitan expanse that New Yorkers usually call “Upstate” has been a major force in the evolution of contemporary media art. Upstate New York artists and engineers designed some of the first technologies that took media-making out of industrial control and into experimenters’ hands, and institutions like the Experimental Television Center helped to transform people’s relationships to media, providing funding and support in New York State, New York City, across the nation and beyond.

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(via A Biennial Asks: Where Is Brooklyn?)
“This exhibition series intends to demonstrate the rich wealth of talent to be found throughout Brooklyn.” This is the mission statement of the BRIC Biennial, which recently launched the first edition of the series in its new home in Fort Greene. This guiding statement, both sincere and vague, raises more questions than anything else: Is it in doubt that Brooklyn is home to thousands of talented artists? What do we learn by grouping them together? And, since we’re on the subject, why a biennial, and where is Brooklyn?
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(via A Biennial Asks: Where Is Brooklyn?)

“This exhibition series intends to demonstrate the rich wealth of talent to be found throughout Brooklyn.” This is the mission statement of the BRIC Biennial, which recently launched the first edition of the series in its new home in Fort Greene. This guiding statement, both sincere and vague, raises more questions than anything else: Is it in doubt that Brooklyn is home to thousands of talented artists? What do we learn by grouping them together? And, since we’re on the subject, why a biennial, and where is Brooklyn?

READ MORE