(via The Pitfalls of Art as Therapy)
CHICAGO — Invented in 2011, Zachary Cahill’s USSA 2012 began as a one-off joke, a half-sketched theoretical future where America was reshaped as a socialist nation. In the following years, the project has project became a loose conceptual wrapper for Cahill’s at times wildly disparate interests: the USSA 2012 project has included explorations of critical comedy, the mythic afterlife of Soviet Communism, Chicago’s political history, and the artist’s ongoing concerns about contemporary art’s agency within the political sphere.
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(via The Pitfalls of Art as Therapy)

CHICAGO — Invented in 2011, Zachary Cahill’s USSA 2012 began as a one-off joke, a half-sketched theoretical future where America was reshaped as a socialist nation. In the following years, the project has project became a loose conceptual wrapper for Cahill’s at times wildly disparate interests: the USSA 2012 project has included explorations of critical comedy, the mythic afterlife of Soviet Communism, Chicago’s political history, and the artist’s ongoing concerns about contemporary art’s agency within the political sphere.

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TalkTalkTalk Back Tuuuuuuesday!

It’s that time of the week again: Talk Back Tuesday, our weekly peek at the work of our followers on Tumblr. Share your work with us here, making sure you include your name, the work’s title, and the year it was made. Anything else you have to share can go here.

We look forward to seeing your work! Thanks so much to everyone who has submitted work, reblogged, liked, or just follows us!

(via Is Creativity Linked to Mobility?)
“Human nature will not flourish, any more than a potato, if it be planted and replanted, for too long a series of generations, in the same worn-out soil,” American author Nathaniel Hawthorne once wrote. The line appears as the epigraph in Jhumpa Lahiri’s 2008 novel Unaccustomed Earth. It’s fitting, not only because Lahiri was born in London to Indian parents and raised in the United States, but also because Lahiri was a recipient of a 2006 MacArthur Fellowship (or “genius grant”). As new data from the MacArthur Foundation suggests, the fellow are an unusually mobile bunch.
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(via Is Creativity Linked to Mobility?)

“Human nature will not flourish, any more than a potato, if it be planted and replanted, for too long a series of generations, in the same worn-out soil,” American author Nathaniel Hawthorne once wrote. The line appears as the epigraph in Jhumpa Lahiri’s 2008 novel Unaccustomed Earth. It’s fitting, not only because Lahiri was born in London to Indian parents and raised in the United States, but also because Lahiri was a recipient of a 2006 MacArthur Fellowship (or “genius grant”). As new data from the MacArthur Foundation suggests, the fellow are an unusually mobile bunch.

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(via Architecture for Humanity at the New Aspen Art Museum)
ASPEN, Colorado — Despite its reputation as a resort town for the 1%, the heart of Aspen looks much like a classic Western American town, with low brick buildings and charming squares perfect for people watching. Some of the trappings of wealth — like Prada and Gucci stores and the prevalence of private jets on the airport’s runways — make clear at least one of the demographics of the town, but it’s also home of the nation’s first rural rapid transit system, and the Aspen-Snowmass area in general remains a popular destination for the middle class.
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(via Architecture for Humanity at the New Aspen Art Museum)

ASPEN, Colorado — Despite its reputation as a resort town for the 1%, the heart of Aspen looks much like a classic Western American town, with low brick buildings and charming squares perfect for people watching. Some of the trappings of wealth — like Prada and Gucci stores and the prevalence of private jets on the airport’s runways — make clear at least one of the demographics of the town, but it’s also home of the nation’s first rural rapid transit system, and the Aspen-Snowmass area in general remains a popular destination for the middle class.

READ MORE