(via Andy Warhol and Jeff Koons and the Culture of Hyperbole)
[Kenneth] Turan’s phrase “the culture of hyperbole” struck a chord. As a poet and art critic, it is impossible to ignore the reams of exaggeration I am bombarded with on a daily basis, from blurbs attesting to the gorgeous mastery to be found in a young poet’s first book to the unrivaled brilliance to be encountered in an artist’s most recent exhibition.
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(via Andy Warhol and Jeff Koons and the Culture of Hyperbole)

[Kenneth] Turan’s phrase “the culture of hyperbole” struck a chord. As a poet and art critic, it is impossible to ignore the reams of exaggeration I am bombarded with on a daily basis, from blurbs attesting to the gorgeous mastery to be found in a young poet’s first book to the unrivaled brilliance to be encountered in an artist’s most recent exhibition.

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(via A Fundamental Rupture: “Itself Not So” at Lisa Cooley)
An intriguing concept: how to create an art exhibition about the inability to communicate? That is what curator Rachel Valinsky has set out to do in Itself Not So, the current group show at Lisa Cooley on the Lower East Side, and for the most part, her selections neatly vault past the inherent paradox of the proposition.
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(via A Fundamental Rupture: “Itself Not So” at Lisa Cooley)

An intriguing concept: how to create an art exhibition about the inability to communicate? That is what curator Rachel Valinsky has set out to do in Itself Not So, the current group show at Lisa Cooley on the Lower East Side, and for the most part, her selections neatly vault past the inherent paradox of the proposition.

READ MORE

(via More Now than Then: When Art Reaches Back)
The current group show at Canada, Anthropocene, casts a very wide net. The term, which means “new human,” is the name given to the current geological period, which began with the transition from hunting-gathering to agriculture, leading to the foundation of formal societies.
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(via More Now than Then: When Art Reaches Back)

The current group show at Canada, Anthropocene, casts a very wide net. The term, which means “new human,” is the name given to the current geological period, which began with the transition from hunting-gathering to agriculture, leading to the foundation of formal societies.

READ MORE