Monica Bonvicini, “NEVER AGAIN” (2005)

This BDSM-reminiscent installation was the winner of the 2005 Preis der Nationalgalerie, an award established by the late Rolf Hoffmann (trustee to the sponsoring Verein der Freunde der Nationalgalerie) to emerging artists under 40 based in Germany. I suppose collector couple Erika and Rolf Hoffmann may represent a lofty goal for art collectors to aspire to — in addition to developing the Turner Prize-inspired award, a fraction of their collection is on view in their Berlin home, with tours given on Saturdays (complete with felt slippers to wear over your shoes while you’re inside). Do art collectors, particularly those who have amassed remarkably substantial collections — owe it to the rest of the art world and public to make their collections accessible, or to support certain scenes? Is it okay just to horde (if you can afford it)?

Monica Bonvicini, “NEVER AGAIN” (2005)

This BDSM-reminiscent installation was the winner of the 2005 Preis der Nationalgalerie, an award established by the late Rolf Hoffmann (trustee to the sponsoring Verein der Freunde der Nationalgalerie) to emerging artists under 40 based in Germany. I suppose collector couple Erika and Rolf Hoffmann may represent a lofty goal for art collectors to aspire to — in addition to developing the Turner Prize-inspired award, a fraction of their collection is on view in their Berlin home, with tours given on Saturdays (complete with felt slippers to wear over your shoes while you’re inside). Do art collectors, particularly those who have amassed remarkably substantial collections — owe it to the rest of the art world and public to make their collections accessible, or to support certain scenes? Is it okay just to horde (if you can afford it)?

Source artnet.com