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2004 posts tagged Art

TalkTalkTalk Back Tuuuuuuesday!

It’s that time of the week again: Talk Back Tuesday, our weekly peek at the work of our followers on Tumblr. Share your work with us here, making sure you include your name, the work’s title, and the year it was made. Anything else you have to share can go here.

We look forward to seeing your work! Thanks so much to everyone who has submitted work, reblogged, liked, or just follows us!

The country of Colombia may have the best Google doodle featuring the work of an artist ever, and all because it would’ve been Feliza Bursztyn's 81st birthday today.
Born in Bogotá, Colombia, in 1933, Bursztyn studied painting in the Art Students League of New York City and sculpture at the Académie de la Grande Chaumière in Paris. She died in 1982 at the age of 48.
Writing about her work, Gina McDaniel Tarver sees Bursztyn’s work as a gesture of anti-colonialism:

Bursztyn has entered the canon of Colombian art history as a key modern artist, but to place emphasis primarily on her formal innovations as they contributed to the development of modern, autonomous art in Colombia is to risk minimizing the ways in which her work challenged cultural hegemony and European-American discourses of modernity. Her art can be interpreted as problematizing the assumption that “development” is the answer to “underdevelopment,” that modernity can be universally beneficial. In their confrontations with dominant power structures in Colombia that sought to control class and gender relations and morality, Bursztyn’s work exposed modernity’s dark side, coloniality.

The country of Colombia may have the best Google doodle featuring the work of an artist ever, and all because it would’ve been Feliza Bursztyn's 81st birthday today.

Born in Bogotá, Colombia, in 1933, Bursztyn studied painting in the Art Students League of New York City and sculpture at the Académie de la Grande Chaumière in Paris. She died in 1982 at the age of 48.

Writing about her work, Gina McDaniel Tarver sees Bursztyn’s work as a gesture of anti-colonialism:

Bursztyn has entered the canon of Colombian art history as a key modern artist, but to place emphasis primarily on her formal innovations as they contributed to the development of modern, autonomous art in Colombia is to risk minimizing the ways in which her work challenged cultural hegemony and European-American discourses of modernity. Her art can be interpreted as problematizing the assumption that “development” is the answer to “underdevelopment,” that modernity can be universally beneficial. In their confrontations with dominant power structures in Colombia that sought to control class and gender relations and morality, Bursztyn’s work exposed modernity’s dark side, coloniality.