(via Airplane Art Through the Ages)
This World Cup, the Brazilian national soccer team has been taking its characteristic flair to new heights. It has been flying to its games in a Boeing 737 painted by identical twin street artists Otavio and Gustavo Pandolfo, better known as Os Gêmeos. Commissioned by GOL Airlines, the brothers covered the plane in a collage of yellow, brown, and white faces that showcase Brazil’s diverse ethnic makeup. It also begs the question: why aren’t more planes covered with art?
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(via Airplane Art Through the Ages)

This World Cup, the Brazilian national soccer team has been taking its characteristic flair to new heights. It has been flying to its games in a Boeing 737 painted by identical twin street artists Otavio and Gustavo Pandolfo, better known as Os Gêmeos. Commissioned by GOL Airlines, the brothers covered the plane in a collage of yellow, brown, and white faces that showcase Brazil’s diverse ethnic makeup. It also begs the question: why aren’t more planes covered with art?

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(via The Trouble with Favela Chic)
A Milwaukee bar called Nomad World Pub wanted to create a special place for its customers to watch the World Cup, so it decided to set up a faux favela inspired by Rio de Janeiro’s poverty-stricken mountainside slums. The fact the space comes with a taco hut — a type of food not even served in Brazil — reveals the depth of ignorance out of which it was created. You have to wonder: is the menu in Spanish too?

(via The Trouble with Favela Chic)

A Milwaukee bar called Nomad World Pub wanted to create a special place for its customers to watch the World Cup, so it decided to set up a faux favela inspired by Rio de Janeiro’s poverty-stricken mountainside slums. The fact the space comes with a taco hut — a type of food not even served in Brazil — reveals the depth of ignorance out of which it was created. You have to wonder: is the menu in Spanish too?

Daniel Fleming, “The World’s Game: 2014” (2014)34x40”Acrylic on Canvas.$2000

I’d like to sell this piece and send 60% to an organization benefitting those relocated due to the World Cup…and then use the 40% remaining to buy supplies for more pieces intended to do the same. Research for organizations starts now…suggestions welcome.

Completed: June 14, 2014
More images below:http://danielflemingart.tumblr.com/post/88814946120/the-worlds-game-30x40-acrylic-on-canvas-1000
 

Daniel Fleming, “The World’s Game: 2014” (2014)
34x40”
Acrylic on Canvas.
$2000

I’d like to sell this piece and send 60% to an organization benefitting those relocated due to the World Cup…and then use the 40% remaining to buy supplies for more pieces intended to do the same. Research for organizations starts now…suggestions welcome.
Completed: June 14, 2014

 

Zen Marie’s Three Stadia, a three channel installation, is currently on view at Museum Africa in Newtown for the SPace: Currencies in Contemporary African Art exhibition. This show, also referred to as “The Artists of Africa,” is a special “2010 FIFA World Cup Host City Johannesburg Event,” apparently working to broadening soccer tourists’ perceptions of South African (or just African?) culture(s). Obviously, the World Cup is huge boon for South African tourism, and the various events and sponsorships developed to support that industry present certain challenges and conflicts, particularly between how the country would like to be seen and the disparate realities that exist. Zen Marie’s piece works to demonstrate the efforts that have gone into “cleaning up” Johannesburg, Durban, and Cape Town. The installation features video taken prior to the World Cup, of areas within what would be FIFA’s 800M “security ring” around the stadiums, depicting the pre-existing realities of each city.

Zen Marie’s Three Stadia, a three channel installation, is currently on view at Museum Africa in Newtown for the SPace: Currencies in Contemporary African Art exhibition. This show, also referred to as “The Artists of Africa,” is a special “2010 FIFA World Cup Host City Johannesburg Event,” apparently working to broadening soccer tourists’ perceptions of South African (or just African?) culture(s). Obviously, the World Cup is huge boon for South African tourism, and the various events and sponsorships developed to support that industry present certain challenges and conflicts, particularly between how the country would like to be seen and the disparate realities that exist. Zen Marie’s piece works to demonstrate the efforts that have gone into “cleaning up” Johannesburg, Durban, and Cape Town. The installation features video taken prior to the World Cup, of areas within what would be FIFA’s 800M “security ring” around the stadiums, depicting the pre-existing realities of each city.