(via Dispatches from the Gateways to Death Valley)
Two rural communities have ominously declared themselves the “Gateway to Death Valley” — Baker, California and Beatty, Nevada — each isolated as the last stop before miles of harsh landscape. Photographer Pamela Littky spent time in both places from 2009 to 2012, getting to know the people there, and how they survive in the inhospitable terrain.
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(via Dispatches from the Gateways to Death Valley)

Two rural communities have ominously declared themselves the “Gateway to Death Valley” — Baker, California and Beatty, Nevada — each isolated as the last stop before miles of harsh landscape. Photographer Pamela Littky spent time in both places from 2009 to 2012, getting to know the people there, and how they survive in the inhospitable terrain.

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(via Portraits of America’s New Nomads)
There is a loose tribe living at nature’s margins in the United States, slaughtering goats raised by hand at Idaho’s Lost River and picking cherries growing wild in California’s Marble Mountain Wilderness. Seattle-based photographer Adrain Chesser followed some of these wanderers from 2006 to 2012, capturing scenes of a rough and nomadic existence.
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(via Portraits of America’s New Nomads)

There is a loose tribe living at nature’s margins in the United States, slaughtering goats raised by hand at Idaho’s Lost River and picking cherries growing wild in California’s Marble Mountain Wilderness. Seattle-based photographer Adrain Chesser followed some of these wanderers from 2006 to 2012, capturing scenes of a rough and nomadic existence.

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(via Stretching the Truth of Photography)
Photography’s initial accomplishment was to allow for the instantaneous transformation of a four-dimensional object or event into a static, two-dimensional representation. However, in the catalogue for the 1970 exhibition Photography into Sculpture at the Museum of Modern Art, Peter C. Burnell — the museum’s then curator of photography — insisted that the medium could be pushed to even greater creative possibilities:
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(via Stretching the Truth of Photography)

Photography’s initial accomplishment was to allow for the instantaneous transformation of a four-dimensional object or event into a static, two-dimensional representation. However, in the catalogue for the 1970 exhibition Photography into Sculpture at the Museum of Modern Art, Peter C. Burnell — the museum’s then curator of photography — insisted that the medium could be pushed to even greater creative possibilities:

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(via A Photographic Survey of America’s Public Libraries)
Walking into my local branch of the Brooklyn Public Library, it looks more or less like any other: computers to the left, children’s section to the right, non-fiction dead ahead. It’s only when I go upstairs to the already small fiction section that I see something abnormal: more shelves are empty than full. That this state of affairs exists in a borough known as a haven for writers makes it a troubling omen.
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(via A Photographic Survey of America’s Public Libraries)

Walking into my local branch of the Brooklyn Public Library, it looks more or less like any other: computers to the left, children’s section to the right, non-fiction dead ahead. It’s only when I go upstairs to the already small fiction section that I see something abnormal: more shelves are empty than full. That this state of affairs exists in a borough known as a haven for writers makes it a troubling omen.

READ MORE