(via Picturing Russia’s Central Asian Diaspora)
Travel to Russia these days, and chances are the person serving you your food is a visitor to the country, too. Every year, 5-6 million Uzbek, Tadjik and Kyrgyz people arrive in the country to work in restaurants, construction sites, farms and manufacturing plants. They are maids, taxi drivers, street sweepers and garbage collectors. In Krgystzstan alone, one quarter of working-age citizens live outside the country.
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(via Picturing Russia’s Central Asian Diaspora)

Travel to Russia these days, and chances are the person serving you your food is a visitor to the country, too. Every year, 5-6 million Uzbek, Tadjik and Kyrgyz people arrive in the country to work in restaurants, construction sites, farms and manufacturing plants. They are maids, taxi drivers, street sweepers and garbage collectors. In Krgystzstan alone, one quarter of working-age citizens live outside the country.

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(via Finding More than Fashion in the Legacy of Nigerian Photographer J.D. ‘Okhai Ojeikere)
When photographer J. D. ‘Okhai Ojeikere passed away this February, he left behind an archive of over 10,000 photographs of his home country Nigeria. Ojeikere is most recognized for the black and white shots of elaborate, gravity-defying Nigerian hairstyles he started photographing in the 1950s, which were presented at last year’s Venice Biennale. Yet as one of the first photojournalists in Nigeria, having lived from 1930 through the country’s independence in 1960, military dictatorships, and village and city life, his perspective was much wider than fashion.
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(via Finding More than Fashion in the Legacy of Nigerian Photographer J.D. ‘Okhai Ojeikere)

When photographer J. D. ‘Okhai Ojeikere passed away this February, he left behind an archive of over 10,000 photographs of his home country Nigeria. Ojeikere is most recognized for the black and white shots of elaborate, gravity-defying Nigerian hairstyles he started photographing in the 1950s, which were presented at last year’s Venice Biennale. Yet as one of the first photojournalists in Nigeria, having lived from 1930 through the country’s independence in 1960, military dictatorships, and village and city life, his perspective was much wider than fashion.

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(via John Yau and Justine Kurland Discuss the Relationship of Photography, Poetry, and Narrative)
The following email exchange with the photographer Justine Kurland focuses on her exhibition, Sincere Auto Care, at Mitchell-Innes & Nash (September 4 – October 11, 2014), which is accompanied by a self-published book with the same title. While Justine was putting together the book, I sent her a poem that I thought had something to do with the images she had sent me to look at. Before I sent her the poem I mentioned the possibility of doing an interview. She agreed to this format as long as she also could ask me questions. This is the result.
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(via John Yau and Justine Kurland Discuss the Relationship of Photography, Poetry, and Narrative)

The following email exchange with the photographer Justine Kurland focuses on her exhibition, Sincere Auto Care, at Mitchell-Innes & Nash (September 4 – October 11, 2014), which is accompanied by a self-published book with the same title. While Justine was putting together the book, I sent her a poem that I thought had something to do with the images she had sent me to look at. Before I sent her the poem I mentioned the possibility of doing an interview. She agreed to this format as long as she also could ask me questions. This is the result.

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(via A 20th-Century Kiowa Photographer Whose Work Shows Tradition in Transition)
For five decades at the beginning of the 20th century, Horace Poolaw photographed a Kiowa community in flux. In black and white, he captured a rare insider’s view of daily tribal life in Oklahoma from the 1920s to 1960s, when the reservations were receding and modernization was embedding in the new state.
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(via A 20th-Century Kiowa Photographer Whose Work Shows Tradition in Transition)

For five decades at the beginning of the 20th century, Horace Poolaw photographed a Kiowa community in flux. In black and white, he captured a rare insider’s view of daily tribal life in Oklahoma from the 1920s to 1960s, when the reservations were receding and modernization was embedding in the new state.

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(via A Chaotic Compendium of the World’s Depravity)
No matter where French photographer Antoine d’Agata travels, he finds the same festering vein of marginalized depravity. Phnom Penh, Bangkok, Damascus, Istanbul, New York, Marseille, San Salvador, Mexico City, Haiti, Hamburg, Havana, Bosnia — he’s visited them all and the anxiety and brief pleasures of the prostitutes, homeless, addicts, and other drifting souls mingles in the same sordid mire.
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(via A Chaotic Compendium of the World’s Depravity)

No matter where French photographer Antoine d’Agata travels, he finds the same festering vein of marginalized depravity. Phnom Penh, Bangkok, Damascus, Istanbul, New York, Marseille, San Salvador, Mexico City, Haiti, Hamburg, Havana, Bosnia — he’s visited them all and the anxiety and brief pleasures of the prostitutes, homeless, addicts, and other drifting souls mingles in the same sordid mire.

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(via Walking the Mysterious and Monumental Nazca Lines)
Sandstorms shifting the terrain of southwest Peru recently revealed new Nazca Lines. Hundreds of the geoglyphs in the desert were already known, showing animals, plants, and geometric designs etched in the earth at an incredible scale, the largest a 935-foot pelican. Yet the purpose of these ancient drawings, produced between about 500 BCE to 500 CE, remains one of history’s enigmas.
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(via Walking the Mysterious and Monumental Nazca Lines)

Sandstorms shifting the terrain of southwest Peru recently revealed new Nazca Lines. Hundreds of the geoglyphs in the desert were already known, showing animals, plants, and geometric designs etched in the earth at an incredible scale, the largest a 935-foot pelican. Yet the purpose of these ancient drawings, produced between about 500 BCE to 500 CE, remains one of history’s enigmas.

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