(via AA Bronson on Queer Collaborations, Shamanism, and Korean History)
GWANGJU, South Korea — For the past several years, AA Bronson’s work has drawn on the acute awareness of radical pedagogies and alternative economies that he developed as a member of the Canadian artists collective General Idea. His recent projects have formed a complex set of methodologies rooted in ritual, religion, publishing, and queer mysticism. For this year’s Gwangju Biennial, curator Jessica Morgan has offered Bronson the special opportunity of occupying a three-storey pagoda built to commemorate victims of Gwangju’s 1980 pro-democracy uprising. Transforming the structure into the “House of Shame,” an arena for shamanistic ceremony and queer underground publications, he has created a dazzling space for a community of radical spirits, past and present. AA Bronson met with me in the pagoda to discuss the project.
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(via AA Bronson on Queer Collaborations, Shamanism, and Korean History)

GWANGJU, South Korea — For the past several years, AA Bronson’s work has drawn on the acute awareness of radical pedagogies and alternative economies that he developed as a member of the Canadian artists collective General Idea. His recent projects have formed a complex set of methodologies rooted in ritual, religion, publishing, and queer mysticism. For this year’s Gwangju Biennial, curator Jessica Morgan has offered Bronson the special opportunity of occupying a three-storey pagoda built to commemorate victims of Gwangju’s 1980 pro-democracy uprising. Transforming the structure into the “House of Shame,” an arena for shamanistic ceremony and queer underground publications, he has created a dazzling space for a community of radical spirits, past and present. AA Bronson met with me in the pagoda to discuss the project.

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