(via Wandering Through the Refuse)
CHICAGO — Judith Mullen’s new work consists of sculptures and paintings that look like detritus, like the sort of thing that accumulates in rivers or forest floors after heavy storms: swirls of leaves, bark, wood chips, pine needles, things discarded by humans, whipped together by wind and rain to float indolently on the wet and dry surfaces of the world.
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(via Wandering Through the Refuse)

CHICAGO — Judith Mullen’s new work consists of sculptures and paintings that look like detritus, like the sort of thing that accumulates in rivers or forest floors after heavy storms: swirls of leaves, bark, wood chips, pine needles, things discarded by humans, whipped together by wind and rain to float indolently on the wet and dry surfaces of the world.

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Sculpting the Thingness of Light

LOS ANGELES — For Helen Pashgian, art exists at the intersection of the material and immaterial. Her use of industrial materials, such as acrylic, epoxy, resin, and metal, combined with complex fabrication processes serve to make the presence of light a substance unto itself. Helen Pashgian: Light Invisible, the artist’s first large-scale sculptural installation, at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, showcases the alchemy of this intersection that transforms both material and light into visibly evanescent forms.

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